Cooking a roast in a hooded barbecue

  1. Preheat the barbecue in line with the type of cut you are roasting (see our chart). For 200ºC the burners should be set at medium. Determine the weight of the roast and brush it lightly with oil. Season with salt, pepper and flavourings.
  2. Place the beef or lamb in the centre of the barbecue. Turn the burners directly under the meat off. The remaining burners are left on to conduct and circulate the heat around the roast.
  3. Close the lid and roast for the recommended cooking time (see below chart). For ease and accuracy use a meat thermometer.
  4. Remove roast when cooked to desired degree. Transfer to a plate, cover loosely with foil and rest it in a warm place for 10-20 minutes before carving. Carve the roast across the grain to ensure tenderness.

Tips for cooking a roast in a barbecue:

  • Avoid lifting the barbecue lid too often (you lose about 10 – 15°C each time). To boost the temperature in a kettle barbecue during roasting, add 6 to 10 heat beads on each side at 1 hour intervals.
  • Avoid ramping up the flame directly under the meat when adjusting the heat as this dries the roast out (giving it a tough under-side).
  • Most roast recipes that use the cuts outlined below can be adapted from oven roasting to roasting in a barbecue.
  • Allow for time out before cooking AND time out after cooking.
  • Make sure the meat stands at room temperature for around 15-20 mins before cooking (no longer in summer and certainly not left in direct sunlight). This takes the fridge chill from the meat and allows it to cook evenly.
  • Leave time for resting after cooking. The meat should stand in a warm place for around 20 mins before carving, otherwise all of the juices will be on the serving plate rather than in the roast. Wrap the roast loosely with foil – not tightly or it will sweat.
  • To take all of the guesswork out use a meat thermometer. Inexpensive leave-in styles cost around $10 from kitchenware shops. Place the meat thermometer in the thickest part of the roast (away from any bone) before cooking. Check the temperature when the estimated cooking time is up, 60°C for rare, 65°C – 70°C for medium and 75°C for well done for beef, lamb or veal.  Pork should reach 71°C for medium and 76°C for well done
 
Cooking chart for roasting beef or lamb in a covered barbecue:
 
CHECK THE TEMPERATURE WHEN THE ESTIMATED COOKING TIME IS UP: 60°C FOR RARE, 65°C – 70°C FOR MEDIUM AND 75°C FOR WELL DONE. 
Cooking chart for roasting pork in a covered barbecue
 
CHECK THE TEMPERATURE WHEN THE ESTIMATED COOKING TIME IS UP: 71°C FOR MEDIUM AND 76°C FOR WELL DONE.